Tag Archives: National Geographic

The unlikely friendship between an orangutan and a dog.

2 Oct

They make an unlikely duo. But after meeting at a reserve for endangered animals, Suryia the orangutan and Roscoe the Bluetick hound have become inseparable. And now the pals have released a picture book capturing their unorthodox friendship. The best friends were besieged by young fans as they held their own signing for the new release at a bookstore in Georgetown, South Carolina.

Best of friends: Suryia the Orangutan and Roscoe the dog at their book signing

Best of friends: Suryia the Orangutan and Roscoe the dog at their book signing

Smile for the camera: But I do wonder if Cheetah and Rin Tin Tin got bored with book signings too?

Smile for the camera: But I do wonder if Cheetah and Rin Tin Tin got bored with book signings too?

A proper nana: Actually, I'd prefer something with a bit more pedigree, chum.

A proper nana: Actually, I’d prefer something with a bit more pedigree, chum.

Entitled Suryia And Roscoe, the book shows the pair enjoying each other’s company at the South Carolina wildlife reserve where they met. In one photo, a stubborn Roscoe refuses to eat a banana offered by his friend. Another shows Suryia in a life jacket closely watching over Roscoe as he goes for a doggie-paddle. And, as if posing for holiday snaps, they are also captured taking walks through the gardens and posing in front of an elephant. The friends have garnered worldwide media attention, appearing in the National Geographic magazine and on the Oprah Winfrey and Ellen DeGeneres shows in the U.S. They met four years ago when Roscoe followed staff from The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species (TIGERS) in Myrtle Beach as they walked home. He was immediately spotted by the orangutan, who ambled over to make friends. Dr Bhagavan Antle, the reserve’s founder, said: ‘Roscoe looked really thin and a little lost so we fed him and took care of him. ‘He followed us through the gate and ran over and found Suryia. As soon as he saw Roscoe, Suryia ran over to him and they started playing.

‘Dogs are usually scared of primates, but they took to each other straight away. We made a few calls to see if he belonged to anyone and when no one came forward, Roscoe ended up staying.’

Prime mates: Thanks to you, I'll always have a woof over my head.

Prime mates: Thanks to you, I’ll always have a woof over my head.

Your future's orange: Yes, I'd say our friendship has been a howling success.

Your future’s orange: Yes, I’d say our friendship has been a howling success.

The Jungle Book: I've a feeling that this story has a happy ending.

The Jungle Book: I’ve a feeling that this story has a happy ending.

Suryia And Roscoe, by Dr Antle, Thea Feldman and photographer Barry Bland

(Via: Daily Mail Online)

National Geographic – Shiba Inu is Most Wolflike

30 Nov

In their February issue, National Geographic (NatGeo? Not a fan of the new name) published an article about how we came to have so many different dog breeds and what we can learn from their genetics. Included in the article is this chart  that generated quite a buzz in the Shiba Inu community. The reason? The chart states that the Shiba Inu breed is genetically closest to the wolf. Chow Chow and Akita came in second and third, Malamute 4th.

The descriptions for each of the 4 categories are a bit vague, with the description for the Wolflike category as follows:

Wolflike
“With roots in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, these breeds are genetically closest to wolves, suggesting they are the oldest domesticated breeds.”

I would not misinterpret this as Shiba Inu having the most wolf-like mentality (pack order, alpha… etc), to me this conveys that the Shiba Inu breed did not have as much genetic tinkering and stayed relatively true to how nature intended. At least that’s how I read it. What do you think?

Yoshimi, a beautiful Shiba Inu, is a frequent VIP guest of The Hydrant.

Cute Animals by Mark Taylor

27 Sep

A British photographer’s adorable images of puppies, ducklings and even kittens in hammocks will brighten up any rainy day. Master of cuteness Mark Taylor’s images are in demand all over the world for the purr-fect way they capture a softer side to our best-loved animals.

Using a simple clean white background and some unusual animal pairings Mr Taylor’s style has seen him make the cover of prestigious wildlife magazine National Geographic. In this set of heart-warming images Mr Taylor shows why he’s one of the best in his field tapping into that desire in us all to see something fluffy. From ducklings with puppies, to dogs with kittens and even rabbits Mark captures them all on camera as if they were the best and friends.

Mr Taylor, 47, creates his images all at his home studio Warren Photographic, in Guildford, Surrey. His father Kim is a world-renowned wildlife photographer. His mother Jane, who died in 2007 after a brave battle against cancer, was one of the first to use a unique style now so well adopted by her son. ‘My mother was a pioneer if you like of this idea of using the clean white backgrounds and I like to think I am carrying on her legacy.’

Check out Warren Photographic to view their extensive library of professional nature and pet photographs.
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