Tag Archives: test

Dog Intelligence Test

15 Mar

Adapted from The Intelligence of Dogs by Stanley Cohen

This is a fun little ‘test’ you can do with your dog – Just don’t take this I.Q. scale too seriously. A dog’s performance on these tests will no doubt be affected by many traits other than “intelligence”, such as confidence, greed, activity level, and previous experiences. It is interesting, however, to see how different dogs react to these challenges. Maybe it will help you to understand your dog a little better.

Test 1 – Problem Solving

Place treat under soup can.

Scoring:

5 Dog gets treat in 0-5 seconds

4 Dog gets treat in 5-15 seconds

3 Dog gets treat in 16-30 seconds

2 Dog gets treat in 31-60 seconds

1 Dog tries to get treat and fails

0 Dog shows no interest

Test 2 – Problem Solving

Quickly throw a large towel over the dog’s head and shoulders.

Scoring:

5 Dog gets free in 0-15 seconds

4 Dog gets free in 16-30 seconds

3 Dog gets free in 31-60 seconds

2 Dog gets free in 1-2 minutes

1 Dog doesn’t get free within 2 minutes

Test 3 – Problem Solving

Place treat under a small towel.

Scoring:

5 Dog gets treat in 0-15 seconds

4 Dog gets treat in 16-30 seconds

3 Dog gets treat in 31-60 seconds

2 Dog gets treat in 1-2 minutes

1 Dog tries to get treat and fails

0 Dog shows no interest

Test 4 – Short Term Memory

Let the dog see you place a biscuit in the corner of the ring, then turn him loose.

Scoring:

5 Dog goes straight to the treat

4 Dog searches systematically and finds the treat

3 Dog searches randomly but finds treat in under 45 seconds

2 Dog searches but fails to find treat

1 Dog shows no interest

Test 5 – Long Term Memory

Let the dog see you place a biscuit in the corner of the room (a different corner than the one in the test 4), remove him for 5 minutes, play with him, return, and then turn him loose.

Scoring:

5 Dog goes straight to treat

4 Dog goes to the corner from test 4, then the correct corner

3 Dog searches systematically and finds treat

2 Dog searches randomly but finds treat in under 45 seconds

1 Dog searches but fails to find treat

0 Dog shows no interest

Test 6 – Problem Solving and Manipulation

Place treat under a low platform (too low and far enough back to reach with mouth).

Scoring:

5 Dog gets treat in under 1 minute

4 Dog gets treat in 1-3 minutes

3 Dog uses paws and muzzle but fails to get treat

2 Dog uses muzzle only a few times and gives up

1 Dog doesn’t try to get treat

Test 7 – Language Comprehension

Leave dog as if for a recall and in your usual voice, call “Refrigerator”.

Scoring:

3 Dog comes

Call “Movies”

2 Dog comes

Call ” (dogs name), Come”

5 Dog comes

Call ” (dogs name), Come” again

4 Dog comes

1 Dog fails to come

Test 8 – Problem Solving

Dog is shown a treat through a slit in a large cardboard barricade. Dog should not be able to get treat through the slit. Handler encourages dog to get treat.

Scoring:

5 Dog goes around barrier in 0-15 seconds

4 Dog goes around barrier in 16-30 seconds

3 Dog goes around barrier in 31-60 seconds

Handler stops encouraging dog after 1 minute

2 Dog goes around barrier in 1-2 minutes

1 Dog tries to reach through slit and gives up

0 Dog shows no interest

Interpretation:

36 – 40 = Genius!

32 – 35 = Highly Intelligent

28 – 31 = High Average

20 – 27 = Average

16 – 19 = Low Average

12 – 15 = Borderline

0 – 11 = Hmm …

Canine Good Neighbour is a PASS!

6 Apr

As wonderful as our weekend at the show was, it only got better.

On Sunday morning, Logan and I took the Canadian Kennel Club’s Canine Good Neighbour evalution, and passed.
This was something that I’ve been talking about doing since I brought Logan home, and this really filled every dream I had of raising and beautiful well adjusted dog.

A little rundown of what the CGN test is:

The Canadian Kennel Club, Canine Good Neighbour program identifies and rewards responsible and caring owners and their canine partners.

The purpose of the Canine Good Neighbour Program test is to ensure that one of our most favoured companions, the dog, is accepted as a valued member of the community. Canine Good Neighbours can be counted on to present good manners at home, in public places and In the presence of other dogs. The program embraces both purebred and mixed-breed dogs and has been created to assist canine owner’s combat anti-dog sentiments which often target dogs as a whole. Additionally, the program enhances community awareness of responsible dog ownership and the benefits associated with dog ownership.

Canine Good Neighbour training is fun, rewarding, and useful. It can enable owners to achieve a better relationship with their dogs.

The test is not a competition calling for precision performance by the handler and dog. Rather, it assesses the handler and dog’s relationship together with the handler’s ability to control the dog.

Dogs are evaluated on their ability to perform basic exercises as well as their ability to demonstrate good manners in everyday situations.

The Canadian Kennel Club encourages all dog owners to participate in this program, thereby ensuring that our beloved canines are welcomed and respected members of our communities.

So, for all those naysayers, who think Dobermans are fierce, aggressive & don’t like strangers, booya!

We passed, and I couldn’t be more proud. :)

Canine Good Neighbour

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